Particles that can’t take corners are filtered out

The picture above shows three trajectories — red, green and orange curves — of particles through a model of a face mask. Face masks are meshes of long thin fibres and the brown discs are cross-sections through these fibres — in a simple model. The blue lines are what are called streamlines, they show the the paths taken by air flowing through the mask, due to the wearer breathing. The trajectories show (at least part of) why masks filter out the bigger droplets from a person’s breath, and it is not because the droplets are too big to fit through holes in the mask.

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Filtering with inertia

Ggstokes

The guy with the great sideburns is George Stokes, a 19th physicist who made many contributions to physics, and after whom the Stokes number is named. In this blog post, I’ll show how his work helps us to understand how to filter out corona-virus laden droplets.

The Stokes number* is one of many dimensionless ratios in fluid mechanics. It tells us about the competition between two timescales, and it applies to particles, eg a droplet of mucus containing corona virus, moving in a flowing fluid, eg our breath.

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